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Ultimate Guide to Filing for Nonprofit Tax: IRS Form 990 Nonprofits Filing Requirements and Deadlines

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Guide to Filing for Nonprofit Tax: IRS Form 990 Nonprofits Filing Requirements and Deadlines to File Form 990

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Navigating the complex world of nonprofit tax filing can be daunting. This comprehensive guide is dedicated to unraveling the intricacies of IRS Form 990, a critical document for nonprofits. Understanding its filing requirements, deadlines, and nuances is essential for maintaining your organization's tax-exempt status and staying compliant with IRS regulations. Whether you’re new to the nonprofit sector or looking to refine your filing process, this article is an indispensable resource.

Should your nonprofit file IRS Form 990?

What is Form 990? Why is it Crucial for Nonprofit Organizations?

Form 990 is a federally mandated tax form designed specifically for nonprofit organizations. By filing this form, nonprofits disclose their financial activities, governance, and programs to the IRS and the public. The information includes revenue sources, expenses, program expenditures, and compensation of top officials. This level of transparency helps maintain public trust in the nonprofit sector. More importantly, it is a legal requirement for preserving the organization's tax-exempt status. A nonprofit must file Form 990 to avoid penalties and avoid losing its tax-exempt status, jeopardizing its funding and operations.

Determining Your Nonprofit Needs to File Form 990

Understanding whether your nonprofit needs to file Form 990 and which version to use is vital for compliance. The requirement hinges on financial thresholds. For example, nonprofits with an annual gross receipt of less than $50,000 file Form 990-N, also known as the e-Postcard, which is a simplified version. Those with higher receipts typically file Form 990 or 990-EZ, depending on their total assets. Determining the right form to file is essential because each form demands varying levels of detail about the organization's finances and operations.

Criteria Form to File Notes

Breaking Down the Different Versions of Form 990 For NonProfits

The IRS offers three main versions of Form 990 to accommodate the diverse sizes and types of nonprofits. Form 990-N (e-Postcard) is for the smallest organizations, Form 990-EZ is for medium-sized nonprofits, and the standard Form 990 is for larger organizations. Each version requires different information. For instance, Form 990-EZ and the standard Form 990 demand more detailed financial information and narratives about the organization's programs, unlike the brief e-Postcard. Choosing the correct form is crucial for compliance and accurately reflecting your organization's financial status.

Key Filing Deadlines: When to Submit Form 990?

Meeting the filing deadline for Form 990 is critical to avoid penalties. Generally, the form is due on the 15th day of the 5th month after the fiscal year-end. For example, if the fiscal year ends on December 31, the deadline is May 15 of the following year. However, the deadline is the next business day if this date falls on a weekend or a public holiday. Organizations can request a six-month extension using Form 8868, but this must be filed before the original due date of Form 990.

The Consequences of Failing to File Form 990

Failure to file Form 990 can have severe implications for a nonprofit. An organization must file the form for three consecutive years to avoid losing its tax-exempt status. This loss of status can lead to taxable income and the need to reapply for tax-exempt status – a time-consuming and costly process. Additionally, late filings can result in financial penalties, with fines accumulating daily. The reputational damage of non-compliance can also impact donor trust and future funding opportunities.

Understanding Tax-Exempt Status and Its Relation to Form 990

Filing Form 990 is integral to maintaining a nonprofit's tax-exempt status. This status allows organizations to be free from federal income tax and potentially receive tax-deductible contributions. The consistent filing of Form 990 assures the IRS and the public that the nonprofit adheres to the operational and financial standards required for tax exemption. It demonstrates that the organization is not operating for profit and is transparent about its financial dealings.

How to File a Form 990: A Step-by-Step Guide

Filing Form 990 involves several meticulous steps. The process begins with gathering accurate financial records, including income statements, balance sheets, and records of expenses. Next, the organization should ensure it selects the correct version of Form 990 based on its size and financial status. Completing the form demands detailed attention to every section, ensuring accuracy and completeness. It's advisable to have the form reviewed by a professional accountant or an experienced tax preparer familiar with nonprofit tax laws before submission.

Avoiding Common Mistakes in Form 990 Filing | Form 990-N | Form 990-T

Common mistakes in Form 990 filings can lead to compliance issues. These include inaccuracies in financial reporting, incomplete schedules, and missing information about governance and operational practices. Nonprofits should ensure that all required parts of the form are completed and that the information provided is consistent with other financial documents. It's also crucial to file on time and use the correct version of the form. Regularly training staff or seeking expert advice can help avoid these errors.

What Happens After Filing Form 990? IRS Processes and Reviews

After a nonprofit submits Form 990, the IRS reviews it for completeness and accuracy. If discrepancies or questions arise, the IRS may contact the nonprofit for clarification or additional documentation. In some cases, this can lead to audits, which are more comprehensive examinations of an organization's financial records and practices. Understanding the review process and being prepared for potential follow-up from the IRS is important for every nonprofit.

Future-Proofing: Keeping Up with Changes in Form 990 Filing Requirements

Staying updated with changes in Form 990 filing requirements is crucial for ongoing compliance. The IRS may revise form instructions, alter financial thresholds for different versions of the form, or introduce new reporting requirements. Nonprofits should regularly check IRS announcements and updates. Consulting with tax professionals and attending relevant seminars or workshops can also help organizations stay informed and prepared for future filing seasons.

Key Takeaways: Navigating IRS Form 990 for Nonprofit Tax | 2023 Tax Year

  • Annual Filing Requirement: Nonprofits are required to file a Form 990 each year, highlighting their operations and financial activities.
  • Determining the Right Form: Depending on your organization's size and type, you may need to file the standard Form 990, Form 990-EZ, or the simpler Form 990-N (e-Postcard).
  • Tax-Exempt Status: To maintain their tax-exempt status, tax-exempt organizations must file Form 990 annually. This form is crucial for organizations like charities, religious groups, and political organizations.
  • For Larger Nonprofits: Larger, more complex organizations must file the standard Form 990 or Form 990-T (for unrelated business income).
  • Compliance with IRS: Filing Form 990 is a legal requirement for nonprofits, as it allows the IRS to monitor and ensure compliance with tax-exempt regulations.
  • Understanding Deadlines: Form 990 is due on the 15th day of the 5th month after the end of your tax year. If you cannot meet this deadline, you can file for an extension.
  • Public Disclosure: Form 990s are public documents. They provide transparency and accountability to donors, stakeholders, and the general public.
  • Consequences of Non-Compliance: Failing to file Form 990 for three consecutive years can result in the loss of tax-exempt status. Late filing can also lead to penalties.
  • Filing Variants for Different Nonprofits: Smaller nonprofits may file Form 990-N, while others might need to file Form 990 or Form 990-EZ. Political organizations have specific filing requirements.
  • Using IRS Resources: The IRS website offers guidelines and resources to help with the filing process. It's essential to stay updated with any changes in filing requirements.
  • Preparing for Filing: Gather all necessary financial records and understand the details required in the form you’re filing.
  • Seek Professional Help if Needed: Consider consulting a tax professional, especially if filing complex forms like Form 990-T or if your nonprofit has multiple activities.
  • Recordkeeping: Maintain accurate and detailed financial records throughout the tax year to ease the filing process.
  • Extension Requests: If you need more time to file your 990 form, submit Form 8868 before the original due date to request an automatic six-month extension.
  • Awareness of Changes: Be aware that IRS 990 requirements can change. Regularly review IRS announcements and updates, especially if your fiscal year begins after July.
  • Nonprofit Tax Forms: Understanding various nonprofit tax forms, including Form 1023 for tax-exempt status application and different 990 forms for annual reporting, is crucial.
  • Filing for Specific Tax Years: Nonprofits need to file their 990 forms for each specific tax year, ensuring they cover all financial activities within that period.
  • Addressing Late Filing: If you file your 990 late, be prepared to explain the delay and possibly face penalties. Prompt action can mitigate some consequences.
  • IRS Form 990-T: Some tax-exempt organizations, especially those with unrelated business income, are required to file Form 990-T in addition to the standard 990 form.
  • Annual Form 990 for Continuity: Filing an annual Form 990 is not just a requirement but a practice that aids in maintaining operational continuity and transparency.
  • IRS Website as a Resource: Utilize the IRS website for up-to-date information, filing tips, and guidance on form requirements, especially for forms that require more detailed information.
  • Requirement for Political Organizations: Political organizations also fall under the umbrella of entities that must file a 990, adhering to specific guidelines pertinent to their operations.
  • Tax Year Beginning After July: For organizations with a tax year beginning after July, it's essential to stay aware of any mid-year changes to IRS policies or form requirements.
  • Understanding the 990 Form: The 990 form requires detailed financial and operational information, making it a comprehensive document that demands accuracy and completeness.
  • Filing Process for Different Nonprofits: Nonprofits need to understand which 990 form applies to them – whether it's filing the 990-N for smaller organizations or the more detailed standard 990 form for larger entities.

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published

January 16, 2024

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